Revenue

Summer Intern Housing - Bay Area

Every year, students around the country vie for internships with top companies like Uber, Google, and Facebook. It’s a grueling process to say the least, as the nation’s best and brightest tend to make for tough competition. You’d think that by the time acceptance letters are mailed out, the worst of it would be over.

Sadly, the headache only begins with the application process. After beating out their peers, students seeking Bay Area summer intern housing are in for a bigger challenge: navigating the high demand and high costs associated with real estate in the region. Even full time employees living in the area find themselves hard-pressed to find affordable housing—for students who’ve practically just begun to invest in their future, the prospect seems impossible.

However, not all is lost for the prospective summer intern. Those who know where to look will find it entirely possible to land a great corporate housing solution in the Bay. Read on to see our tips on scouting out the real estate options you’d need to make the most out of your internship opportunities.

 

Golden Gate Bridge and San Francisco Skyline

Photo borrowed from lennar.com

Bay Area Summer Intern Housing: What Should I Be Looking For?

If you’re under the impression that the best kind of summer intern housing you’d be able to net in the Bay Area amounts to a run-down nightmare of bedbugs and leaky faucets, take relief in the fact that more hospitable options exist at reasonable prices.

Consider the following before you take to the market:

Reputation

Entering into a contract with a landlord can be likened to marriage: it can lead to a whole slew of happy memories and meaningful experiences. Likewise, it can also leave you begging for a vacation at the nearest motel.

Finding a landlord with a good reputation is crucial. It’s the fine line between a quick and professional response when things go wrong and a month spent getting used to the smell of black mold. 

Miniature House and Keys

Photo borrowed from realtybiznews.com

In your early interactions, keep an eye out for the telltale signs of a good landlord. Walk away if they don’t feel eager to communicate or answer questions, or if they seem more fixated on how much they can make off you than how they might make your stay a pleasant one. Being a bright-eyed summer intern isn’t an excuse to be duped.

Space

There are plenty of reasons why you’d want to find an apartment with generous floor space. Aesthetically, wider living spaces feel cleaner, more organized, and generally more livable. They also provide more space for your belongings and activities, and believe it or not, are better for your health.

Now, we aren’t telling you to aim for a sprawling manor or luxury villa—just that a cramped pod is far from where you should peg your expectations. When shopping around for temporary housing San Francisco, aim for at least 350 square feet for a single-bathroom studio apartment; anything smaller and you’re short-changing yourself.

Furnishing

It goes without saying that a summer intern shouldn’t move into empty housing. Furnished rental units are par for the course in the Bay Area, but seeing the word, “furnished” in a listing isn’t any guarantee of quality. You want to avoid a home full of broken or unsanitary furniture at all costs.

If you’re scouting for a unit online, ask for the most recent set of pictures that the host might have of the interiors. You should also do your best to look around for any reviews that past travelers might have written online. Nowadays, it’s an easy thing to find any potential deal-breakers like worn linens and broken appliances.

Just because you’re off to a summer internship out of town doesn’t mean you should do away with the comforts of home!

Cost

Last year’s $3,300 monthly average for rent is a daunting number. There’s no sugarcoating the fact that even some of the most promising rental bargains in the Bay Area can cost you an arm and a leg.

Miniature House and Money Stack

Photo borrowed from rentcafe.com

If you’re a summer intern seeking housing, odds are you aren’t expecting a big allowance for the duration of your program. Luckily, there are units in the region that satisfy the points we’ve touched on so far, for more manageable prices. Keep your eyes peeled for nightly rates of $70 to $80: they’re uncommon, but make a big difference when it comes to your projected expenses. If the unit is comfortable and secure, snatch up the deal before somebody else does.

Bay Area Summer Intern Housing: Where Should I Look?

The jury’s out on the best place to look for temporary housing. Some say you can’t go wrong with traditional listings: classified ads either on paper or online, though we find that reviews and testimonials for units like these can be hard to find. Moreover, you’d be taking the people who list these ads on good faith, without a system to rely on to ensure their professionalism.

Naturally, we at 2nd Address prefer a homegrown solution to the problem: finding, booking, and reviewing properties for rent on a convenient digital platform aimed to make things easier for travelers looking for a place to stay for months at a time.

The problem of reputation is covered by the fact that hosts on our site adhere to our standards for professionalism, as well as the fact that the site’s feedback system allows users to rate and recommend their hosts as they please. As a result, our listings are generally spacious, well-furnished, and well-designed (nobody wants to bother with hosting a sub-par unit). Finally, the cost of each rental property varies, but we’ve seen gorgeous studio apartments in the Bay Area listed for as low as $67 a night—with those prices, you may even get to enjoy some of the awesome things San Francisco has to offer.

The time and effort saved by visiting a website that consolidates the rental process is invaluable, especially if you’re working with a slim window of opportunity. It’s a big load off your shoulders if you can search for a unit, do your background research, and finalize booking in a matter of minutes.

Conclusion

A summer internship at a major corporation is a once in a lifetime opportunity that no qualified applicant should have to pass up on account of a lack of affordable housing. You worked too hard and for too long not to scale that last hurdle.

Face the Bay Area housing market with confidence with 2nd Address’ guarantee of professionalism, reliability, and convenience.